What is the difference between an Embassy and a High Commission?
They basically both mean the same thing except that High Commission is used instead of Embassy between Commonwealth countries (NZ, Australia, Canada, UK etc). This is because ambassadors and embassies are exchanged between foreign countries and Commonwealth member countries have maintained that they are not 'foreign' to one another.

The office of a Consul is termed a Consulate, and is usually subordinate to the state's main representation in that foreign country, usually an Embassy, or High Commission between Commonwealth countries, in the capital city of the host state

New Zealand High Commission Australia
Commonwealth Avenue
Canberra ACT 2600
AUSTRALIA
Telephone: +61 -(0)2 - 6270 4211

Request for consular access for people in immigration detention Form 1360

Form 1360 is a request that we recommend all NZ detainees complete and submit as it allows our NZ Consulate to be able to monitor Health and Wellbeing.

Email received by a whanau/family which helps to explain the role of the NZ High Commission:

Tena koe M.

Thank you for your message.

The New Zealand High Commission hasn’t been able to receive information about S  from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP).

This is because DIBP can’t release information about the detainee until the detainee has signed a Request for Consular Contact form (DIBP 1360) which gives consent for the High Commission to contact the detainee and engage with DIBP staff.

We understand S has not signed this form. However we request you encourage him to do so when you’re able to make contact and speak with him.

Once he signs the document, we can then engage directly with him and the Department.  

To assist this, the New Zealand High Commission is writing a letter to S (via the Department of Immigration and Border Protection) to also ask him to sign the 1360 form. This will be an additional attempt to ask him to sign.  In this letter we also ask about his health and welfare.  

On your question around S’s detention to Christmas Island, I’m not sure if, in our consular role, we can ask that question?

Our consular role means we can (if requested by the detainee):

1.       Inform next of kin or other relatives/friends of their arrest;

2.       Seek financial assistance for detainees;  

3.       Arrange transfer of funds from family and friends for payment of legal expenses;

4.       Take up any justified complaint the detainee might have about ill treatment or discrimination with the Australian Government Authorities; and,

5.       Advise the detainee of the local law society so the detainee can contact and seek legal assistance/advice; and

6.       Advise the detainee’s lawyer (if one is engaged).

What we can’t do is:

1.       Select a lawyer for the detainee;

2.       Provide legal advice or pay for legal fees;

3.       Have the detainee released from detention; or,

4.       Intervene in the judicial process of Australia.

However what we’re focused on and hoping to achieve is to hear back from S  through this letter, and through your talks with him.

So we would be very grateful if you can inform me of any updates especially if he signs the 1360 form. This will let us engage better with S.

No reira kaati ake nei

Warm regards

*If you would like a copy of the PDF file emailed to you please email iwinaus@gmail.com - request Form 1360.

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Important – Please read this information carefully before you complete your request. Once you have completed your request we strongly advise that you keep a copy for your records.

Who should use this form?

If you are in immigration detention, you should use this form to request the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (the department) to notify your consulate of your immigration detention or to request contact with a consular officer of your country of citizenship. Once completed, please provide this form to an officer of the department.

Consular access

You may request the department to notify your consulate of your immigration detention. If you wish to personally contact your consulate you can ask an officer of the department for assistance to do so at any time. You may also request for a consular officer to visit you at your place of immigration detention. The department will forward to your consulate correspondence from you, and will provide you with any correspondence from your consulate. Please be aware that the department may later provide your personal information to your consulate with or without your consent for a range of purposes under the Migration Act 1958.

Important information about privacy

The department respects your privacy. We are aware that the way information about you is used and managed can affect your life. It is important the information we hold is accurate, up to date and relevant. It is also important that the information is used only for the reason it was collected. Safeguards in respect of the collection, access, storage and disclosure of personal identifying information are in place and departmental practices are monitored to ensure that your personal information is kept secure and confidential. Your personal information is protected by law, including the Privacy Act 1988. Important information about the collection, use and disclosure (to other agencies and third parties, including overseas entities) of your personal information, including sensitive information, is contained in form 1442i Privacy notice. Form 1442i is available from the department’s website www.immi.gov.au/allforms/ or offices of the department. You should ensure that you read and understand form 1442i before completing this form.

Complaints

How to make a complaint to the department If you believe the department has wrongly collected or handled your information, you can: • telephone the department’s Global Feedback Unit on 133 177 during normal business hours; • complete a feedback form online at www.immi.gov.au • write to: The Manager Global Feedback Unit GPO Box 241 MELBOURNE VIC 3001 AUSTRALIA • contact us directly through any office of the department. The department is committed to the quick and fair resolution of complaints. Your complaint will be investigated and you will be advised of the outcome.

How to make a complaint to the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC)

If you are not satisfied with the department’s response, you can write to the OAIC. The OAIC can investigate privacy complaints about the protection of personal information, order compensation to be paid where warranted and direct departments to change the way they handle personal information. The OAIC can receive privacy complaints: • through the online Privacy complaint form (Refer to the OAIC’s website); • by mail (If you have concerns about postal security, send you complaint by registered mail); • by fax; • by mail (Note: Email that is not encrypted can be copied and tracked). OAIC contact details Email: enquiries@oaic.gov.au Fax: +61 2 9284 9666 Post: Sydney Office GPO Box 5218 SYDNEY NSW 2001 You may make a complaint directly to the OAIC rather than to the department, however it is likely that the OAIC will recommend that you try to resolve the complaint directly with the department in the first instance. If you need help lodging a complaint with the OAIC you can call the OAIC Enquiries Line: In Australia: 1300 363 992 Outside Australia: +61 2 9284 9749.

Interpreter assistance

Interpreter assistance is available via the department’s translating and interpreting service (TIS National), which provides a national 24 hours a day, 7 days a week telephone service on national telephone number 131 450.

New Zealand High Commission Canberra, Australia

Commonwealth Avenue
Canberra ACT 2600
Australia

Telephone: +61 -(0)2 - 6270 4211
Facsimile: +61 -(0)2 - 6273 3194
Email: nzhccba@bigpond.net.au
Office hours: Mon-Fri 0845-1700s

New Zealand High Commission Canberra, Australia

What the High Commission does

The High Commission houses staff representing a number of agencies:

  • New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  • New Zealand Customs
  • New Zealand Defence
  • New Zealand Police

The work we do

Political, economic and trade relations

The New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade works to make New Zealand's voice heard overseas and contributes directly to the security and well-being of all New Zealanders. The Ministry, through its diplomatic service, is charged by Government to ensure that New Zealand's voice is heard abroad and that security and economic interests are advanced and protected (from MFAT website). The Ministry is also a channel through which the New Zealand Government promotes its international agenda and deals with other countries and organisations.

The High Commission in Canberra promotes and protects New Zealand’s political, economic and trade interests in Australia, including through the promotion of foreign and trade policy cooperation and the deepening and broadening of economic linkages.  New Zealand and Australia also often work closely together in international forums and the High Commission assists in the facilitation of such engagement. 

Consular assistance

The High Commission also provides consular assistance to resident and visiting New Zealanders, including emergency assistance and advice in the case of arrests, hospitalisation or loss of passports. It is important to be aware however, that the High Commission is limited in what it can do and does not have funds available for those who fall into financial difficulty.

Email received by the High Commission: Query was about a family member who is on the Christmas Island Detention Centre   -

The New Zealand High Commission hasn’t been able to receive information about [501] from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP).

This is because DIBP can’t release information about the detainee until the detainee has signed a Request for Consular Contact form (DIBP 1360) which gives consent for the High Commission to contact the detainee and engage with DIBP staff.

We understand [501] has not signed this form. However we request you encourage him to do so when you’re able to make contact and speak with him.

Once he signs the document, we can then engage directly with him and the Department.  

To assist this, the New Zealand High Commission is writing a letter to [501] (via the Department of Immigration and Border Protection) to also ask him to sign the 1360 form. This will be an additional attempt to ask him to sign.  In this letter we also ask about his health and welfare.  

On your question around [501] detention to Christmas Island, I’m not sure if, in our consular role, we can ask that question?

Our consular role means we can (if requested by the detainee):

1.       Inform next of kin or other relatives/friends of their arrest;

2.       Seek financial assistance for detainees;  

3.       Arrange transfer of funds from family and friends for payment of legal expenses;

4.       Take up any justified complaint the detainee might have about ill treatment or discrimination with the Australian Government Authorities; and,

5.       Advise the detainee of the local law society so the detainee can contact and seek legal assistance/advice; and

6.       Advise the detainee’s lawyer (if one is engaged).

What we can’t do is:

1.       Select a lawyer for the detainee;

2.       Provide legal advice or pay for legal fees;

3.       Have the detainee released from detention; or,

4.       Intervene in the judicial process of Australia.

However what we’re focused on and hoping to achieve is to hear back from [501] through this letter, and through your talks with him.

So we would be very grateful if you can inform me of any updates especially if he signs the 1360 form. This will let us engage better with [501].

.