E nga poutokomanawa o te iwi kei Ahitereiria, ka nui aku mihi ki a koutou e hapai ana o to tatou mana, me te wairua o te tangata kei tawahi na. Thank you all for the very important work you are doing to uphold the mana and to lift the spirits of our people who have chosen to make their homes in Australia. New Zealanders who live in Australia have experienced hard times, prejudice, unequal treatment and at times outright racism. Whether it is lack of access to social, educational, vocational or health support, the detention of ex-prisoners or the deportation of kiwis who have had their visas revoked, you are the people who are striving to give New Zealand born Australians a fair go. Your work has been noticed in New Zealand and on behalf of all whanau who remain at home, we thank you. Regardless of the side of the Tasman we live, our most basic dream is for a place to call home, whanau to love and provide for, and a future to hope for. The treatment of New Zealand born Australians by the Australian Government threatens those dreams. In the last few days there has been progress. That progress has come from the pressure of your efforts. Those of us in New Zealand have followed your example and exerted pressure on the New Zealand Government. As happy as we are at the progress made, we are well aware that there will be kiwi winners and losers. This progress is part of the longer journey. The destination is still to be reached. We must continue with our efforts until all New Zealand and all Australian citizens, regardless of which side of the Tasman they decide to call home, enjoy equal rights. The inter-state ‘hikoi’ is a monumental undertaking. It requires belief, energy, commitment and sacrifice, but above all it requires a love and selflessness for our people. Me maumaharatia tatou i nga korero o o tatou tupuna, “He aha te mea nui o te ao? He tangata, he tangata, he tangata.” Doing what is right is not always easy, but it is always right. I expect to join you in Sydney on Thursday 17 March for the first three days. I look forward to supporting this hikoi in the belief that every action raises awareness for the cause and will ultimately lead to the fulfilment of our dream of a better future for all of our whanau.   Nga manaakitanga o te Runga Rawa ki runga I a koutou katoa. ____________________________________________________________________________________ Kelvin Davis MP for Te Tai Tokerau

E nga poutokomanawa o te iwi kei Ahitereiria, ka nui aku mihi ki a koutou e hapai ana o to tatou mana, me te wairua o te tangata kei tawahi na.

Thank you all for the very important work you are doing to uphold the mana and to lift the spirits of our people who have chosen to make their homes in Australia.

New Zealanders who live in Australia have experienced hard times, prejudice, unequal treatment and at times outright racism.

Whether it is lack of access to social, educational, vocational or health support, the detention of ex-prisoners or the deportation of kiwis who have had their visas revoked, you are the people who are striving to give New Zealand born Australians a fair go.

Your work has been noticed in New Zealand and on behalf of all whanau who remain at home, we thank you.

Regardless of the side of the Tasman we live, our most basic dream is for a place to call home, whanau to love and provide for, and a future to hope for.

The treatment of New Zealand born Australians by the Australian Government threatens those dreams.

In the last few days there has been progress.

That progress has come from the pressure of your efforts.

Those of us in New Zealand have followed your example and exerted pressure on the New Zealand Government. As happy as we are at the progress made, we are well aware that there will be kiwi winners and losers. This progress is part of the longer journey. The destination is still to be reached.

We must continue with our efforts until all New Zealand and all Australian citizens, regardless of which side of the Tasman they decide to call home, enjoy equal rights.

The inter-state ‘hikoi’ is a monumental undertaking. It requires belief, energy, commitment and sacrifice, but above all it requires a love and selflessness for our people.

Me maumaharatia tatou i nga korero o o tatou tupuna, “He aha te mea nui o te ao? He tangata, he tangata, he tangata.”

Doing what is right is not always easy, but it is always right.

I expect to join you in Sydney on Thursday 17 March for the first three days. I look forward to supporting this hikoi in the belief that every action raises awareness for the cause and will ultimately lead to the fulfilment of our dream of a better future for all of our whanau.

 

Nga manaakitanga o te Runga Rawa ki runga I a koutou katoa.

____________________________________________________________________________________

Kelvin Davis

MP for Te Tai Tokerau

Facebook Page Route 501: https://www.facebook.com/Route501/

Published on Mar 17, 2016

Māori in Australia have launched a hīkoi around the country they and many other Kiwis call home. A new law means many of them and their whānau are being deported and they want to let the Australian Government know that their treatment of New Zealanders is not ok.

Only a monster would lock people up and cast them away without any regard to them, their families or their children. Detention centres are NOT humane, they are places where evil practices occur, money is poured into back pockets and hidden abuses are rife.

Published on Apr 2, 2016

Ko Haapu & Mehaka Lee Te Puia's photos have no past not pending convictions whatsoever yet are detained in Casurina super maximum prison in Perth, Western Australia. Despite this the Daily Telegraph shamelessly uses their images to illustrate Kiwis being deported and give the impression they are convicted criminals.

Erina Morunga, Filipa Payne, Kiri Barber and Roger Reeves drive 17,500km around Australia to take an important political issue to the people. The hikoi/journey is completed in NZ. Route 501's purpose is to raise awareness and education about section 501 of the Migration Act 1958 which was amended on the 12 Dec 2014. This change has caused mandatory cancellations to visas which has had a profound affect. Since then failing a good character test has become pivotal in the destruction of ordinary people's lives including their children and families. More details can be found on www.iwinaus.org/visacancellations  #Route501

Erina Morunga, Filipa Payne, Kiri Barber and Roger Reeves drive 17,500km around Australia to take an important political issue to the people. The hikoi/journey is completed in NZ. Route 501's purpose is to raise awareness and education about section 501 of the Migration Act 1958 which was amended on the 12 Dec 2014.

Erina Morunga, Filipa Payne, Kiri Barber and Roger Reeves drive 17,500km around Australia to take an important political issue to the people. The hikoi/journey is completed in NZ. Route 501's purpose is to raise awareness and education about section 501 of the Migration Act 1958 which was amended on the 12 Dec 2014.

Erina Morunga, Filipa Payne, Kiri Barber and Roger Reeves drive 17,500km around Australia to take an important political issue to the people. The hikoi/journey is completed in NZ. Route 501's purpose is to raise awareness and education about section 501 of the Migration Act 1958 which was amended on the 12 Dec 2014.

Kia ora whanau, 
Back on track with our movie making. Keep checking for new ones as I try to catch up on the past 4 days worth! 

Our videos are all getting posted to YouTube now that I've worked out how to do it from my mobile! :)

Mauri ora
Erina and Route 501 team x

Visit to Albany Regional Prison. #Route501 Raising awareness and education around Section 501 of the Migration Act 1958 #iwinaus #liberty #dignity #equality